Category Archives: projects: early historic

Pre-1700 costumes. Historic, historic inspired or recreations from historical productions.

easy mantua cutting

(updated on my research site: https://www.thefrockchick.com/the-baroque-frock/easy-mantua-cutting/ )

I did manage to cut my fabric panels for my mantua, it really is pretty darm easy as it is all on the grain rectangles. It is pretty much exactly what I expect from a pre-1920s measure, cut, fit process. It looks a bit different but ultimately it’s a case of wait to floor, shoulders to waist and that’s it. Everything else is adjustable to suit.

I knew I wanted my side extensions to be only one full width of fabric (so two widths of a more in era width. I cut (tore) one width from waist to floor plus a hand width for turnings. Then folded on the diagonal to form the two side extensions.

The underskirt is cut from three drops of fabric as these tend to be between 5-7 widths of in era fabric widths. I will wind up with side openings which will allow me to wear pockets underneath. The Henri Bonnart illustrations show a lot of openings for pockets.

The front of the robe was cut from one full width of fabric as long as from my shoulder to floor plus two hand widths. One hand width is to extend the fronts over the shoulder, the other is for turning.

To cut the back panel I laid the extensions next to the front panels and lined up the remaining fabric from top of the front panel down to waist and then followed the diagonal of the side extensions.

I didn’t want a very long train so I cut a curve about 3-4 hand widths.

The rest of the fabric will be used for sleeves and facings.

Since these I have machine stitched the joins and pressed them back ready for stitching. I haven’t yet done so as I need to really look through the Diderot stitches. Okay. Not totally clear but:

https://quod.lib.umich.edu/d/did/did2222.0000.178?view=text;rgn=main
The Encyclopedia of Diderot & d’Alembert Collaborative Translation Project.
PLANCHE IX.
Tailleur d’habits et tailleur de corps

Livre L’Encyclopédie. [38], Arts de l’habillement : [recueil de planches sur les … Diderot, Denis (1713-1784)
https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k9978d/f46.item

Points de couture.

Fig, 1. 2. & 3. Elévation & places de dessus & de dessous du point de devanten piquant les deux étoffes de haut-en-bas & de bas-en-haut.
Fig, 4. 5. & 6. Point de côté ramenant le fil en-deffous par-dehors après avoir piqué les deux étoffes.
Fig, 7. 8. & 9. Point-arriere ou arriere-point, repiquant de haut-en-bas au milieu du point-arriere après avoir piqué de bas-en-haut.
Fig, 10. 11. & 11. Point lacé comme le point-arriere, lieu qu’il fe fait au- en deux tems, revenu en-hauton ferre le point, & retournant l’aiguille on repique en-arriere commeau précédent.
Fig, 13. 14. & 15. Point à rabattre fur la main piquant le haut-en-bas & de bas-en-hauten-avant les points drus espacés & également.
Fig, 16. 17. & 18. Point à rabattre fous la main commele dernier au-lieu qu’ayant percé l’étoffe supérieure on pique-l’étoffe inférieure par-dehors, ensuite on pique les deux en remontant.
Fig, 19. 20. & 21. Point à rentraire comme le point à rabattre fur la main se faisant en deux tems en retournant l’aiguille avant tout il faut joindre à point fimple les deux envers l’étoffe retournée on ferre de ce point les deux retours il faut pour cela très-peu d’étoffe &les points très-courts.
Le point perdu n’eft qu’un point-arriere ajouté au precédent.
Fig, 22. 23.& Point traversé, couture à deux fils croisés.
Fig, 25. A, premiere opération; point coulé ou la passe, c’eft la boutonniere tracée de deux fils. B, la passe fermée du point de boutonniere. C, la passe achevée & terminée de deux brides à chaque bout quel’on enferme de deux rangs de points noués

Google translated:

BOARD IX.
Sewing stitches.
Fig, 1. 2. & 3. Elevation & places from above & from the fronten point pricking the two fabrics from top-to-bottom & bottom-to-top.
Fig, 4. 5. & 6. Side point bringing the wire in-bursts from outside after stitching the two fabrics.
Fig, 7. 8. & 9. Point-back or back-point, pushing up and down in the middle of the back-stitch after dipping from below upwards.
Fig, 10. 11. & 11. Point laced like the point-back, place which it is made in two tenses, returned to the top, turns the point, and turning the needle backwards.
Fig, 13. 14. & 15. Point to be folded on the hand, stitching up-down and down-up in front of the thick points spaced & equally.
Fig, 16. 17. & 18. Point to be folded in the hand as the last one instead of having pierced the upper stuff, the lower stuff is thrown out, then the two are stitched upwards.

Fig, 19. 20. & 21. Point to point as the point to be folded on the hand being done in two times by turning the needle before all must be joined at the same time the two to the returned fabric we iron this point both returns require very little material and very short points.
The lost point is only a back-point added to the previous one.
Fig. 22. 23. & Crossed point, cross-stitched seam.
Fig, 25. A, first operation; cast point or the pass, it is the buttonhole traced two sons. B, the closed pass of the boutonniere point. C, the pass is completed & completed with two straps at each end which enclose two rows of knotted stitches

Google translate can’t really understand it. But I am no better off reading heh translation here: https://quod.lib.umich.edu/d/did/did2222.0000.178?view=text;rgn=main

Figures 13. 14. and 15. Overhand hem stitch piercing from top-to-bottom and from bottom-to-top in front, the stitches densely spaced and even.
Figures 16. 17. and 18. Underhand hem stitch [is] like the last, except that having pierced the upper fabric one pierces the lower fabric at the outside, one pierces the two together fortifying.

The Encyclopedia of Diderot & d’Alembert Collaborative Translation Project.

http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.did2222.0000.178


https://quod.lib.umich.edu/d/did/did2222.0000.178?view=text;rgn=main
The Encyclopedia of Diderot & d’Alembert Collaborative Translation Project.
PLANCHE X.

Livre L’Encyclopédie. [38], Arts de l’habillement : [recueil de planches sur les … Diderot, Denis (1713-1784)
https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k9978d/f46.item

Fig, 1. 2. & 3. Points noués simples de neuf différentes formes.
Fig, 4. Points noués doubles de trois différentes sortes.
Fig, 6. & 7. Points croisés de simples & doubles de neuf différentes sortes.

Google translation:

Fig, 1. 2. & 3. Simple knotted stitches of nine different shapes.
Fig, 4. Double knotted stitches of three different kinds.
Fig, 5. 6. & 7. Cross points of single & double of nine different
kinds.

To be honest it is the section on linen items that has nice clear hemming illustrated.

LivreL’Encyclopédie. [38], Arts de l’habillement : [recueil de planches sur les … Diderot, Denis (1713-1784)
https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k9978d/f46.item
PLANCHE Iere.

Livre L’Encyclopédie. [38], Arts de l’habillement : [recueil de planches sur les … Diderot, Denis (1713-1784)
https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k9978d/f46.item

FIGURES
Fig, 1. Le point de surjet.
Fig, 2. Le point de côté.
Fig, 3. Le point-arriere ou arriere-point:
Fig, 4. Le point devant.
Fig, 5. La couture rabattue.
Fig, 6. Le point noué ou point de boutonniere.
Fig, 7. Le point de chaînette.
Fig, S. Le point croisê.
Fig, 9. Peignoir en pagode:
Fig, 10. Bonnet piqué.
Fig, 11. Coëffure de dentelle.
Fig, 12. Coëffure à deux rangs ou à bavolet.
Fig, 13. Grande coëffe en mousèline. A coëffure en papillon sur une tête de carton.

Google translation:

FIGURES
Fig, 1. The overlock stitch.
Fig, 2. The side point.
Fig, 3. The rear-end or back-point:
Fig, 4. The point in front.
Fig, 5. The seam folded.
Fig, 6. The lockstitch or boutonniere.
Fig, 7. The chain stitch.
Fig, S. The point crossed.
Fig, 9. Bathrobe in pagoda:
Fig, 10. Quilted hat.
Fig, 11. Scallop Coif of lace.
Fig, 12. Coeffure Coif with two rows or bolster.
Fig, 13. Large mussel cockerel mouseline coif. A butterfly coif on a cardboard head.

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stickelchen progress

 

My Mr Boo tribute fits in really nicely. He will need to be unpicked to put the embroidered body in place but I really wanted to test the shapes and embossing depth and get used to it first 🙂 he will have a little fat belly. He’ll have his ears and nose partly etched so his heart nose is really

obvious.

But the rest of the leaves and pearls have been stitched down too 🙂

The front piece will need leaves to have holes stamped out of the end. So not doing that past 9pm as it is now though!

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big day

Finally have my studio feeling spacious. There has been a lot of digging through stash to divest the burden, still lots more to go and we have so much old furniture to get rid of too.

Anyway. Today I cut and pressed all the gold trim of the saree. Well now gold. I used RIT color remover to turn the base fabric yolk yellow and the metal tarnished to gold.

 

These are photos from the auction. As soon as the seller added these I clicked by it now 🙂 That double border does go from one end to the other, or did, and there was a 2 yard length on the other side (one width). Real metal, cold to the touch.

The space between the double border has also been turned into narrow trim for the chemise.

The main body? Well I’ll have to cut to shape then use that for the kirtle bodice. That is mostly not metal, but a double satin. It’s pretty darn amazing as a piece that has been totally able to be used with minimal waste.

Today I cut the sleeves and lined the bodice and refitted it (based on the Mary of Hungary bodice which really relies on the bias at the waist to fit!) So on the whole really stepped up to get this ready.

I have plans to go to Hamilton Gardens with a good friend and get photos. Honestly, I just want to get all my gear out there and photographed. All of it. No, no exceptions. All  of it.

 

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very down

Not sure if fatigue is worse this year or what, but today has been spent trying to be at least upright and it has felt like a struggle all day, and that is after a day sleep that usually does help.

But we did have “not a storm really” last night which brought down this tree. And it was partially sheltered by the garage and house next door.

So pretty much all I did was overhand over my seams to stop them from twisting in the skirt.

 

Okay I did also manage to mostly remove colour from the saree borders, but I have to be careful as it’s the same kind of fabric as one I took too far. And there are still red patches.

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anne of cleves stickelchen

Okay, this has taken forever and I was trying to get this ready for.. tomorrow. AHAHAHAHAHHAAH!!!

But I decided to not take any shortcuts (except to stabilise layers before hand working.)

So this meant stretching the velvet and pearls over the base. Loose over handing of the back, then the front with tinier over handing.

Okay it’s not Anne’s because I do like a little room for interpretation and originality.

And this work? Well I had to carefully remove it all as a few branches were just off enough that I was not happy.

Rare back view as it doesn’t show that well on the form. Well it does but it doesn’t sit in the right place 🙂

And on top of the saree I picked up just tonight. It is vintage style and is very similar in hand to the saree I partially gave away a while back. This should decolour but it will be a little tougher than the recent saree.

There are a few larger gaps than intended in the stickelchen so there will be tidying tomorrow as well as tiny twigs like seen almost in the centre of the image below.

With all this, and with the news about the new schnittbuch it’s reinvigorated my desire to get The Frazzled Frau (boards under my name- all right at the top 🙂 ) back up and running. If there are pins from trusted sources I repin, if I have tracked down through image searches I pin anew and smile when it turns out others have pinned from the source too 🙂

But ah well currently using a mix of apps that are better than notepad but not as flash as I’d really like. But that’s xml documents for you. But essentially finding all the for public posts and making them public again 🙂 I’ve been blogging since 2001 so it’s an old habit and it’s not always been easy finding the balance 🙂

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update to the meisterschnittbuch

https://www.facebook.com/schnittbucher/posts/1718310801816017

Schnittbucher Platz’s update today!

Marion McNealy and Katherine Barich are working on a massive project to get the book* translated! Not just translated but with pattern layouts, transcriptions, and more as per their Drei Schnittbucher book!

I was pretty darn excited because even though myself and others love primary material, the joy of Drei Schnittbucher is that you can use the primary sources as well as know the transcription, translation and interpretations all come from expert analysis.

So, very excited 🙂

*Sammlung: Kunstbibliothek Berlin
URN: urn:nbn:de:gbv:601-3222
Titel: Meisterstückbuch der Schneiderzunft zu Schwabach gefertigt von Joh. Georg Schuster
Publikationsort: Berlin
Herausgeber: null
Ausgabebezeichnung: [Electronic ed.]
Größe der Vorlage: 2°
Persistente Url: http://www.digishelf.de/piresolver?id=77488794X

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full scan of Meisterstückbuch der Schneiderzunft zu Schwabach

I am about to faint. I check every so often to see if there are documents I did not see in previous searches, or if new documents are available- there is so much available to us that is buried behind “popular” sites in searches.

Sammlung: Kunstbibliothek Berlin
URN: urn:nbn:de:gbv:601-3222
Titel: Meisterstückbuch der Schneiderzunft zu Schwabach gefertigt von Joh. Georg Schuster
Publikationsort: Berlin
Herausgeber: null
Ausgabebezeichnung: [Electronic ed.]
Größe der Vorlage: 2°
Persistente Url: http://www.digishelf.de/piresolver?id=77488794X

And particularly: http://www.digishelf.de/objekt/77488794X/46/

So you can see why I am sure this is where Kohler got his pattern bases from.

 

Not sure why he put the bodice in one piece but then the book has just finished downloading for me and I am too excited to not share before fully digesting 🙂

 

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cleves is sort of on track

I woke early and put Pride and Prejudice on and sewed. And sewed.

Backtracking a few days: My support bodice has been theorised and made. Basically I went this area has both Dutch and German influences and I really don’t want another sidelacing support so what if…?”

The shoulder is cut separately like in Alcega and other tailors. Because like me those tailors said “man this wastes fabric also I want a stable neckline all on the grain thankyouverymuch.”

I have done this since.. well the Kampfrau at least, but  in all the site moves this has been lost. So, that’s the two-fold benefit of cutting shoulders separately. Oh, but the shoulders are a single layer like the Effigy stays because it really is super comfy!

Then I wanted to try to use the overhanded body seams. This was nervewracking! I know the curvy S front seam means that’s where fitting happens, but it is very apparent from extant items that the side back was where the final fitting happens. This is clear when you look at the even seam allowances at the front but uneven allowances at the side back. That can only happen if the fronts were fitted and made up and the side backs done last.

I have managed that through very bad initial fitting stages though…

So here is my cunning method of transferring a seam and also my curvy S front seam. The entire bodice (aside from sloping neckline) is straight from a tailor’s book seen in Kohler’s History of Costume that looked like it was made up but is definitely from an extant manual.

I thought it was in Drei Schnittbucher (which really I hope everyone has) but I think was in another article. I will find it. Meanwhile the Kohler diagrams:

So finally I used twill tape to stabilise where I’ll be poking lacing holes, and bound the entire piece by hand.

Lots of falling in love with all the characters from P&P here and also lots of life lessons between my first viewing and latest!

So that wasn’t enough. I also removed the dye from the brocade for the hem of the gown proper and started putting the stickelchen together properly.

I like making hats, I love millinery. So of course am doing this as complicated as possible. But it’s at least plausible and mimics the structure I know was used for rigid headgear at this time. Oh trust me that documentation is coming but it’s been a slog to reverse image search as my bookmarks are out of control! And because it’s been over a decade since this project started there are broken links to hunt for archival forms 😉

The twill tape is to stabilise the edges.And the front shell is in place and the jeweled band is in progress. Just second guessing a few decisions for that one. I just don’t have the finding I know I want to use. The pretty ones clearly have glued stones and the “aged” gold is just not what you want for period items (you didn’t pretend the bling was dirty or not real, you wanted the bling!.)

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would love to see these as a group

Loved the Swiss style as captured by Holbein but these sketches in particular:

I think they’d make a fantastic group project, I used them for inspiration for my swiss gown though never actually copied directly.

These are all from Bildindex.de, and the old site says some are part of the kupferstichkabinett though they don’t show in the new site: Basel, Öffentliche Kunstsammlung

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cleves progress

Today the carpal tunnel injections have proven their worth 🙂 If I can do this one or two more times before I have to have surgery I’ll be happy. Sounds like I need my ulna’s chopped off sooner, but, maybe?

Also I may have gone through 1/4 of my Hot Cinnamon Sunset tea. Now if I could get a perma-stash of that I’d be happy 😉

Okay so putting fabric away up high just made my radial stuff really make a statement but I am just wandering around with bandages around my wrists not full splints 🙂

But I have cut my Cleves skirt fully, an entirely new kirtle bodice (hey Michaela it’s summer, you do not want linen canvas, cotton twill, and silk underneath those layers for the bodice) from my linen twill.

Just took a break to share this. I usually work with non easy to photograph fabric so this is why I’m sharing now! I usually use a mechanical pencil and draw directly under the pins that emerge from the top but I just had chalk out there today.

Also yes, florist pins. They grip better and I can really pull in my seams to fit properly. It’s easy to see how, I also overlap them to work like boning/support.

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