beaded tablier the hunt and the context

 

 

Contemporary style:

Harper’s Bazar Ball Toilette, (2.11.1882, cover). Magnolia satin with rosy hints. Tablier is embroidered in silks and beads, terminated at the food by two pleatings of the satin. )

I did find a few more examples of a the tablier style covered in beads. But I need to explain what a tablier is.

It means apron. But it is important to understand what an apron in fashion in the natural form and sencond bustle era looked like. It was plain and pulled back. So it’s basically a plain skirt front as opposed to one covered in drapery or rushing etc.

Wedding dress Place of origin: Paris (made) Date: 19/02/1880 (worn) Artist/Maker: Worth, Charles Frederick, Materials and Techniques: Silk satin, lace and net, lined with silk, imitation of pearls embroidery, velvet Museum number: T.62 to B-1976
5: Wedding dress Date:1881 Culture:American Medium:silk, pearl Credit Line:Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art,Accession Number:2009.300.3847a, b
Wedding Dress c. 1882 – England Material Ivory silk brocade of gold thread with floral pattern; trimmed with silk tulle, Brussels lace, beads, and imitation pearls; 240cm-length train with fifteen tiered flounce. Inventory Number(s) AC2203 79-9-8AB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6:Dress About 1885, 19th century Gift of Miss Estelle Holland M20296.1-2 © McCord Museum Keywords: Dress (85)
2: Medium: Green/brown changéant silk velvet, lace, beads, rhinestones, and gold metallic cord Date: 1889-1890 Country: France  Object Number: P91.55.6
Evening dress Date:1888–89 Culture:American Medium:silk Accession Number:C.I.47.65.1a, b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A garment found several years ago on ebay.
Another earlier ebay find

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There was some exploration of asymmetry of these overlayers of beaded silk especially when on a delicate fabric.

Name: Wedding Dress Date: 1887 Place: United States Medium: silk, beads, faux pearls
Classification: Women’s Ceremonial Dress Department: Fashion Arts and Textiles  No: 1971.320
Maria Feodorovna (1847-1928), Princess, Tsaritsa, Glucksberg family, Romanov family
Maria Feodorovna (1847-1928), Princess, Tsaritsa, Glucksberg family, Romanov family

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I adore these oversized pearls on thin silver beaded loops. Some of the other gowns how tassels and loops made from matching pearl beads (see garment immediately to right), but this is quite a statement.

 

And then we come to the two Sunburst gowns. Worth regularly repeated his designs, with some adjustments based on the new client.

Evening Dress© The Kyoto Costume Institute Evening Dress c. 1894 Designer Charles-Frederick Worth  Material Ivory silk satin two-piece dress; gigot sleeves; pale pink silk chiffon decoration at neck and bodice; skirt with sunbeam and cloud asymmetry pattern of pale pink silk tulle insertion and bead embroidery. Inventory Number(s) AC4799 84-9-2AB
Ball gown Design House:House of Worth (French, 1858–1956) Designer:Charles Frederick Worth Date:ca. 1887 Medium:silk, glass, metallic thread  Accession Number:49.3.28a, b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This just happens to be a very obvious copy due to the single large stylised motif across the entire skirt. These just stand out a mile away!  These do also make use of cut work and so perhaps represent an early start to the later gown with heavy use of cutwork. They certainly show more in character and line to the vertical plant motifs than the layers of net and beads.

And that seems to have lead to experimentation with full skirt length motifs.

Ball gown Design House:House of Worth Designer:Jean-Philippe Worth (French, 1856–1926) Date:1900 Medium:silk, rhinestones Credit Line:Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Accession Number:2009.300.1250a, b
Harper;s Bazar, 1894. (3.17.94, cover) Coiffure from Lentheric of Paris. Pale sky blue satin bordered in black fur. Beaded irises cover the side front seams.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(BTW that shape of the wheat sheaf gown is well represented in other garments Worth created especially in velvet or fabric a la disposition.)

And what can we say about this gown that has not already bean said:

THE ‘LILY’ EVENING GOWN, WORTH WORN BY COMTESSE GREFFULHE Worth Gift of the Duc de Gramont Circa 1896 Black silk velvet, white silk satin (for the partially modern collar), white satin appliqués embroidered with metal cannetilles and gold sequins. GAL1978.20.1

 

Still no luck tracking down the book so I went looking on  Worldcat

So this allowed me to look for a book published between 1970 and 1996 (the year I know I saw it) that is about wedding dresses and probably by a museum. I though Museum of London based on the format I had in my head but well:

Wedding dress : 1740-1970
Author: Madeleine Ginsburg; Victoria and Albert Museum.
Publisher: London : H.M.S.O., 1981.
Edition/Format: Print book : National government publication : English

This sounds like the puppy!!!. And it is still available at the library I know it was from. And I recall the production I was in that caused the book to be at a rehersal:

Trial By Jury! Yes, a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta about a bride and with all her bridesmaids in tow! I then requested a whole lot of other useful book s 🙂

 

CF Worth disposition gowns

Help. Obsessed. There may have been a Pinterest board created and it may be strictly properly sourced and maybe just updated with a gown that is included in one of the few Lafayette photos to have lots of close views. Such bliss.

I know a lot of people have been inspired by RedThreaded’s Worth gown, but there may be some weird web archiving glitch so here it is for anyone not yet seen! Cynthia’s gown next to the originals!

Garment entirely created by Cynthia Settje of red threaded.
Date:1898–1900 Culture:French Medium:silk Credit Line:Gift of Miss Eva Drexel Dahlgren, 1976 Accession Number:1976.258.1a, b
Date:1898–1900 Culture:French Medium:(a, b) silk Credit Line:Gift of Mrs. C. Phillip Miller, 1957 Accession Number:C.I.57.17.8a–d

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So while looking for themes and understanding my favourite gowns in context the velvet and satin gowns came up over and over again. So I shall add to this blog post as more pop up, and I wrestle with WP layouts.

First one that I adore:

Sitter: Lillie Langtry (stage name) Lady De Bathe, née Emilie Charlotte Le Breton (1853-1929).

LANGTRY, MRS
Neg. No: 2194
Neg. Size: 15″X12″
Neg. Date: 10-11-1899

I think this may be my favourite of all the gowns Worth produced like this. Though that may be because it’s Lily Langtry!

Yes, I often combine my interest in theatre, costume, and stage so of course I have a lovely file archive of Mrs Langrty.

 

I think my other favourites would have to be these

Date:1899 Culture:French Medium:silk Credit Line:Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Edith Gardiner, 1926 Accession Number:2009.300.2981a, b
Date:1898–1900 Culture:French Medium:silk, cotton Credit Line:Gift of Miss Eva Drexel Dahlgren, 1976 Accession Number:1976.258.4a, b
Date:1898–1900 Culture:French Medium:silk, glass Credit Line:Gift of Miss Eva Drexel Dahlgren, 1976 Accession Number:1976.258.5a–c

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These next three fascinate me, the high neck of two and the delicate butterflies of the third.

Palais Galliera Worth, Tea gown, 1895 © Photograph rights reserved / Mairie de Paris
Date:1896 Culture:French Medium:silk, pearl Credit Line:Gift of Miss Agnes Miles Carpenter, 1941 Accession Number:C.I.41.14.1
Date:1898 Culture:French Medium:silk, Credit Line:Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Mrs. Paul Pennoyer, 1965 Accession Number:2009.300.1324a, b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This first one has horizontal bust darts! As well as curved bust seams and a waist seam to get that beautiful shaping of the velvet.

Date:1889 Culture:French Medium:silk Credit Line:Gift of Mrs. James G. Flockhart, 1968 Accession Number:C.I.68.53.11a, b
Bunka Gakuen Costume Museum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And finally we have the gowns for those slightly more conservative. Which is nice- obviously the gowns caught the eye of many and they wanted a part of what made these gowns so special. No less care, just a slightly less start style!

REFERENCE46.258.2A-BTECHNICAL DETAILS Black voided velvet with branching floral and foliate motif Label: Worth / Paris; 66271 (handwritten)
Date:1898–1900 Culture:French Medium:silk, cotton Credit Line:Gift of Miss Eva Drexel Dahlgren, 1976 Accession Number:1976.258.3a, b
WORTH EVENING DRESS with COURT TRAIN WORN by FORMER FIRST LADY HARRIET LANE at the COURT of ST. JAMES, c. 1898.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But all this has been part of my life tidying that has been happening- organising books, papers, digital files. So this has meant reorganising my patterns and WIP and thus my recent flurry of posts.

 

I’ll be trying to get all my Mina posts from before the website changeover, but that may be a bit difficult!

another dress making book

How to dress well on a shilling a day: a ladies’guide to home dressmaking and millinery.

Highly recommended for the text as it describes the order of sewing and how to. That paragraph on the “bulgarian fold” is really amazing! At least for coming out and stating that the “peacock” style train is impossible to self arrange! Which is something I have trying to get across when getting photos of my gowns with trains- they need a wrangler to look good!

myras threepenny journal

MYRA’S THREEPENNY JOURNAL (1882)

I had only read of this by the term “Myra’s” so finding a copy at all has been fun. This again mainly has plates with front and back views but a few plates stand out, again I love the use of folds and pleats 😉

 

oh no!

I still believe one of my beaded skirt obsessions was from a tiny book on costume, probably wedding dresses and is almost certainly gone (the library probably has removed the book from even stack.)

But I think I may also have totally forgotten that one of my favourite costumes from film has a very heavily pearled tablier!

http://www.wornthrough.com/2014/02/museum-life-film-costume-in-the-gallery-and-the-archive/

and:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bauhausfrau/albums/72157632918697746

In fact this so closely matches my image in my head that perhaps I was thinking of it all along!

Though the company that created the gown is very well known for using historic sources so there may also be some influence of the same sources!

wedding gown musings

Sierra Boggess shared this image yesterday and can you see what has made me so excited? The fabric is thin. Well fairly thin- the flash and angle allows us to see her skin across the arm while the fabric looks more opaque closer to the armscye (where the fabric turns and follows the curve of her shoulder.) The sleeves are either unlined or lined with something very fine while the bodice is flat lined in a solid white.

I tend to double line my bodices and either not line or line my sleeves in a very thin material too.

Also if you follow the lines of the fabric on her sleeve you can see how very shallow the sleeve head is. This is both era appropriate and theatre appropriate as it means you can get your arms over your head. Notice the small wrinkles between shoulder and armscye? Yep. Modern patterns try to eliminate that by using a very tall sleeve head and that is what gives us limited arm range.

The effort to make a garment look good on the stand makes for a garment that is far less practical.

Anyway, just my thought process when I look at new/different images of the same garment 🙂 It’s all about the fit.

 

Oh and there is probably a bit of ease in the top of the sleeve head, I use three rows of stitches to do this rather than two as it does makes the fine gathers almost invisible.

Happy birthday to @andrewlloydwebber!!!!! So grateful you are on this planet!!!

A post shared by Sierra Boggess (@officialsierraboggess) on

 

era: c1840

material: cotton with padded front

found: 2004

I am fabiliar with padding being used in some later gowns- mainly areound the front of the armscye to help reduce wrinkles, but this is quite different. Also effective! This era is post romantic stays with the long rigid busk that pushed the bust upwards, and the start of the opening busk and slightly lowered bust that came with it. This padding helps maintain raised bust, or creates one.

Other construction notes are to follow the pattern direction- the waist is on the grain, only diverting in the front point. this helps stabilise the waist.

While this is a cotton bodice, the lightness of the construction can be seen across most garments from this era and beyond. all the support of skirt shapes and body line is created in undergarments.

rock the frock-1840s

era: 1840s

material: cotton mull or muslin

found: ebay 2005

 

This kind of sheer dress is on my “most looked for” list when I hunt out, and this is just so perfect an example but with such clever sleeve details so as to make this one likely to be moved into the “must make” folder 🙂 I have a gown I could make over into this 🙂 time to get that dress back into my site pages too.

rock the frock- 1870s

era: 1870s

material: silk

found: ebay 2004

   

Okay, this is just very cool and beautiful. The skirt is lined in a matching glazed cotton and the back has a closing that will avoid any gaping appearing- possibly needed due to the very short center back peplum.

The sleeve shape is very full at the upper part which suggests this is possibly very late 1860s or very early 1870s.

rock the frock- 1880s

era: 1880s

material: wool

found: ebay 2004

 

Oh my. How beaituful The skirt has a plain front with very sharp pressed pleats in the back that each show off the woven design beautiful.

The hanging tabs can be seen in garments from at least the 1860s but this half skirt made from them replaces a traditional apron type of drapery.