Shaak Ti?

So having practiced so many times with my Ahsoka molds, and previous methods with Shaak Ti.. I may actually be able to use what I have learnt with Ahsoka to use my Shaak Ti molds again 🙂

(Photo above: metal shelves with cement molds of different sizes, bottom shelf supporting in particular the two part molds for Ahsoka Tano and Shaak Ti creature effects.)

This is very exciting. To find a method that creates a predictable latex cast, that is durable and light. I think I may need to do a video guide as if takes both hands, well full body, and is so messy it would ruin my camera equipment to try and get photos.

But it winds up cheaper than a purely slush cast piece with about the same flex and is lighter. I still need to test if the support I used for Shaak Ti will work with this new method, but I do have hope.

(photo above: two part molds resting against a white wall and on grass with exposed topsoil.)

The cast has also not pulled from the molds as much as previous which means it is likely to shrink less. While these molds were relatively easy to work with it may prove more troublesome with the Shaak Ti molds as there are more ridges. But these are exactly why I want to keep using this method- the ridges tend to cause latex to clump into deeper parts of the mold and crete weak thin casts over the higher parts.

Tomorrow I will test it.

This method may also work for Turian jaws and mask 🙂 Right now the flat back cast for the jaws work very nicely.

 

form and function

Over the years I have come to the conclusion I have a very distinct style, even across multiple eras and genres. There is a very obvious pattern to what appeals when one is a maker first, fan second.

I am a fan of when function meets form. So working out a puzzle of construction is incredibly satisfying. If it has to be draped on the stand all the better. Fabric manipulation for fit especially.

 

Contrast. Big colour and texture blocks. But that can sometimes be subtle, like the seam details on the backs of late 18thC bodices.

I keep flicking between eras/genres and it’s because I want to understand how the very different constructions affect fit and perceptions of ideal body types. The 1920s velvet gowns I’m making superficially look like the bias cut gowns of a decade later but really rely on different fabric use to achieve it.

Right now I’d love to do an essay on how extant items can tell us more about how clothes were made than first appearance. But it is a bit reliant on getting some of my own gear finished. So that is the aim this year. Finish the historic projects to really highlight what I want to say.

Got a lot of writing and sewing to do to actually get there though!

@SWTOR ASHARA IN PRODUCTION!

by admin, January 14, 2015

Believe it or not the extreme sun is not helpful casting latex but this is the base hold everything together layer, next up is the evening and texturising.
The montral molds are in the pink bin. They are all different shades but they do match 🙂