Uncategorized

Ahsoka Lives!

I have been slowly filling and restoring the fibreglass shell into a more stable support for taking proper casts from.

sm_DSC_5701 sm_DSC_5702 sm_DSC_5703

sm_DSC_5704 sm_DSC_5709 sm_DSC_5711

There are several layers now, and since I can’t work with epoxy I had to brave the stinkyness that is builders bog and polyester resin. I am not a fan as it eats in to polystyrene which is what most prototyping options are (this wig head, insulation foam etc.). But it does stick to epoxy really well so it at least reenforcing my previous work rather than being a brittle layer over. Which it is but…

 

So the sculpt was in oil clay, a quick copy was made from fabric and epoxy resin, cut off, taped to a wig head and backfilled with expanding foam. I should have kept the two halves separate then cut the foam out- under pressure even with the ends open the foam distorted the shell.

Then pink builders putty (polyester filler) was scraped on and sanded back with a mouse sander. This black gloss coat is polyester resin with black pigment powder brushed on with a toothbrush to work it in to every tiny deviation in the surface and to work any sanding powders in to the new layer. I would use a liquid surface cleaner for future coats but this was intended to seal and expose major landmark deviations.

When building you need to consider many different places at one. So there needs to be not just fine surface details (corrected with sanding, primer coats etc.) but also rather large deviations across hand sized surfaces. This can be obscured by different colours used in fillers, or different clay colours. Sometimes these colours also hint at different densities, and in this case the filler was easier to sand/cut back than the resin soaked fabric.

This coat will allow for finer surface details, or to create a rough coat to work clay over for future molding options.